Why it works

The economics of climate change is simple: attaching a price to greenhouse gases.

 

Zero emissions by 2035, and no negative economic impact? Here is why the global climate tax works:
  • GHG tax increases cost of fossil energy. The cost pressure is an incentive to become more efficient (innovation drive), as well as looking for alternatives
  • Fossil energy and energy intensive products/services will become more expensive – incentive to save energy
  • Regressive cash-back will increase purchase power of low-income brackets, maintain the purchase power of the middle class, and not affect the high-income brackets. More cash in the hands of the lower-income brackets equals higher spending, equals growth for local businesses
  • Electricity generated form wind and the sun is cheaper than fossil generated electricity already now. The investment in renewable energy infrastructure is further lowering cost of clean energy: the energy of choice will be renewable
  • The investments in the renewable energy infrastructure will create more jobs than will be lost in the fossil industry

 

Schematic overview of the economic impacts of the global climate tax: the economic benefits outweigh the additional costs
Schematic overview of the economic impacts of the global climate tax: the economic benefits outweigh the additional costs

 

An economic no-brainer

The economics of climate change is simple – it is an economic no-brainer. A a group of leading economists – including 25 Nobel laureates and 4 former fed heads – have already been urging the US to introduce a domestic carbon tax.

The global climate tax goes a step further – by lifting the tax to the global level, thus excluding potential economic disadvantages from countries that do vs countries that do not introduce such taxes.

 

 

Quick links

Downloads

Short explained:

Download the teaser

 

Interested in the details?

Download the global climate tax evaluation report – “Changing Climate Change”
Download the Executive Summary of the Report